3 High Performance Habits For Sports Or Business

Harder or Smarter?

That’s the question.

The difference between hard training and smart training has sparked a great discussion amongst coaches and trainers everywhere.

Coaches and trainers tend to divide themselves into two kinds. 

On one side, there is the “train hard” coach, and on the other, the “train smart” coach.

Some prefer a high quantity of work.

But on the opposing side, some prefer a high quality of work.

There are a few problems with this simple distinction (as I’m sure by now, you can anticipate).

Neither side (hard or smart) has captured the complete picture of high-performance training.

High Performance Habits

Hard and smart alone are high performance habits but they’re not enough for unlocking the #1 habit.

Consistency is vital if you want to reach Mount Rushmore (aka the best of the best) in sports or business.

That means that consistency tied up in both hard and smart cannot be overlooked.

These high performance habits are mutually determinant. 

The only way to guarantee any of them is to aim for all of them. 

The way to do this is simple:

Set big goals and play the long game.

The bigger the vision, the longer the path to get there. ‘

This long-term mentality not only makes us perform better in sports and business but also more fulfilled individuals in life too! 

Through this approach, you can enjoy small successes as well as the ongoing journey to overall success in sports or business.

These high performance habits can be and is beneficial at all stages in your journey.

In short, high-performance a habit for LIFE.

Habit #1: Hard Effort

Hard performance training is quantity-focused and requires a lot of energy.

It’s the old-school approach to performance that’s rooted in training a high quantity of mainly physical energy. 

When you train hard, you ignite a spark. 

But you fail a lot, too. 

If you persevere and don’t make excuses, you become resilient. 

With time, hard training transforms into smart.

Hard is where things start, but it’s not something that ever ends. 

You never graduate from hard, no matter how much success you achieve.

Habit #2: Smart Effort

Smart performance training is more quality and less quantity. 

But in comparison to hard, smart training requires less energy and time.

It’s mainly high-quality mental energy.

It’s the bridge between old ways and more efficient new ones.

As you continue to improve your physical fitness, you also prime your mental fitness. It’s a win-win. 

It’s through practicing and working in new ways that our mind fires in complicated directions. 

We are priming ourselves for higher performance by merely doing our best (both in quality and quantity).

As with our bodies, our minds grow, too. 

Of course, hard and smart will change depending on the sport or industry. 

Still, high-performance training is always goal-specific and something you can take with you from one goal to another.

Habit #3: Consistency

There are ways to get even more results through both quantity and quality. 

In many cases, you can achieve a lot more because you have more time and energy. 

Consistency leads to complete and total focus on the integration of your mind and body into a lifestyle that helps you reach your #1 goal. 

Each one of these high-performance phases is a dynamic force on its own, but the three combined is a robust, tri-braided cord that is unbreakable.

Consistent performance training is the way that hard and smart begin to become the #1 high-performance habit for sports and business. 

With time, habits become a lifestyle.

By making this habit part of your lifestyle, the lifestyle becomes effortless. 

Therefore, your highest results are your default setting.

So don’t just work. Instead, develop a work ethic rooted in high-performance training, the habitual path to make progress toward your biggest goals and best life.

Real high-performance training always requires that you have a specific goal in mind. Still, it goes further, strengthening a mindset that you can carry with you from goal to goal

Best,

Scott

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